The company is supported by experts in the field of bacteriophage technology, plant-pathogen interactions and agri-tech policy. Their input is valuable to the decision making within APS regarding the application and development of the Biolyse® technology. We are always interested to hear from experts in the field that might be interested to work with us; please contact us if you feel that your skills could complement our current activities.

Professor Martha Clokie PhD, University of Leicester   Martha has published widely in the field of the ecology and molecular biology of bacteriophage and their interactions with their hosts. She has a particular interest in the exploitation of bacteriophage for improved therapeutics and diagnostics, together with the determination of the molecular basis of successful interactions between bacteriophage and their hosts; an area in which she works closely with APS on. She also acts widely as an international bacteriophage expert; e.g. member of the Advisory Council of the PhageBiotics Foundation (USA) and the bacteriophage classification study group for ICTV.

Professor Martha Clokie PhD, University of Leicester

Martha has published widely in the field of the ecology and molecular biology of bacteriophage and their interactions with their hosts. She has a particular interest in the exploitation of bacteriophage for improved therapeutics and diagnostics, together with the determination of the molecular basis of successful interactions between bacteriophage and their hosts; an area in which she works closely with APS on. She also acts widely as an international bacteriophage expert; e.g. member of the Advisory Council of the PhageBiotics Foundation (USA) and the bacteriophage classification study group for ICTV.

David Kenyon PhD, SASA   David is a molecular plant pathologist with over 20 years’ experience of research on plant-microbe interactions focusing on broad-leaved crops. He has been the Head of Diagnostics, Wildlife and Molecular Biology at SASA since 2009. His department leads on the development of novel diagnostic methods for the detection of plant pests and pathogens and their application in the routine surveillance programs or the study disease development in the environment; the use of molecular methods in wildlife crime forensics and advice on wildlife monitoring and management. David actively collaborates with APS on the development of bacteriophage mixtures for plant protection.

David Kenyon PhD, SASA

David is a molecular plant pathologist with over 20 years’ experience of research on plant-microbe interactions focusing on broad-leaved crops. He has been the Head of Diagnostics, Wildlife and Molecular Biology at SASA since 2009. His department leads on the development of novel diagnostic methods for the detection of plant pests and pathogens and their application in the routine surveillance programs or the study disease development in the environment; the use of molecular methods in wildlife crime forensics and advice on wildlife monitoring and management. David actively collaborates with APS on the development of bacteriophage mixtures for plant protection.

Professor Ian Toth PhD, James Hutton Institute   Ian has an international reputation in the field of blackleg ecology and management, with a particular interest in the molecular basis of pathogenicity in the pathogens involved. He works closely with APS on the direction of the bacteriophage R&D in relation to this disease. He has undertaken research on blackleg disease for over 30 years and has worked extensively with the potato industry, including those partners above. He currently leads AHDB- and Scottish Government-funded projects involving these and other academic and industry partners. His was one of the first to isolate bacteriophage to the blackleg pathogen.

Professor Ian Toth PhD, James Hutton Institute

Ian has an international reputation in the field of blackleg ecology and management, with a particular interest in the molecular basis of pathogenicity in the pathogens involved. He works closely with APS on the direction of the bacteriophage R&D in relation to this disease. He has undertaken research on blackleg disease for over 30 years and has worked extensively with the potato industry, including those partners above. He currently leads AHDB- and Scottish Government-funded projects involving these and other academic and industry partners. His was one of the first to isolate bacteriophage to the blackleg pathogen.